This is the third column in succession that I have drawn on the wisdom of Richard Carlson from his book, “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Amid the storms of life, some people find out that they have an illness that changes their lives. Sometimes their illness makes them realize they will not be able to live a normal life and do things they hoped to do. But for others, their illness makes them determined to live a full life.

For several columns in the past, I have drawn on the wisdom of Richard Carlson who wrote the book, “Don’t sweat the small stuff” which has the sub-title, ‘Simple ways to keep the little things from taking over your life.’

In the book, The spirit of Canada, edited by Amy Newmark & Janet Matthews, Shirley Brooks-Jones of Dublin, Ohio, tells about a flight she was on from Frankfurt, Germany, headed for Atlanta, Georgia.

In his book, Easier than you think, Richard Carlson has a chapter in which he talks about the importance of reading. He acknowledges that there was a time in his life when he felt that he didn’t have enough time to read. But as he writes, “It is one of the most important transformations any …

Dr. Bernie Siegel, in his book, 365 Prescriptions for the soul, has an interesting prescription on dogs, and what they can teach us.

Recently I was having a conversation with an individual who said, in no uncertain terms, that climate change is not a reality. It reminded me of a statement made by U.S. President Donald Trump that climate change is “a hoax”.

Richard Wagamese (1955-2017) was an Ojibway from the Wabaseemoong First Nation in northwestern Ontario. On the inside cover of his book, Embers, it says of him: ”...he was recognized as one of Canada’s foremost First Nations authors and storytellers who authored 15 books.

In his book, Don’t sweat the small stuff, Richard Carlson has a chapter entitled, “Think of what you have instead of what you want.”

In MP Dan Albas’ column of July 7, 2017, regarding the federal government’s $10.5-million payment to Omar Khadr, he failed to mention some important facts.

Most of us are aware of the terrorist attacks that took place in London, England on June 3, and that a B.C. woman, among others, died on London Bridge in the arms of her fiance. A rented van had “plowed through a crowd of pedestrians” who were walking along the sidewalk.

In his book, 365 Prescriptions for the Soul, Dr. Bernie Siegel writes about the importance of living our lives in a way that is satisfying to us.

From time to time, but more often than one might expect, we hear of police officers being killed in the line of duty. On such occasions, there is widespread support from fellow-officers, some of whom travel great distances to attend the funeral and to give their support to the grieving family.

In the book, Chicken soup for the golden soul, there is a story submitted by Paul J. Meyer entitled “A million dollar smile”. It is about a group of volunteers who spend an hour every week, teaching children how to learn to read.

It was heart-warming to read the March 6 article in the Herald in which the local Rotary Club had invited Michael Welsh to speak to their members. Welsh is the B.C. president of the Canadian Bar Association.

In his book, Easier than you think, Richard Carlson tells of a time when he was having a business problem and, as he puts it, "I was at the end of my rope trying to figure it out on my own."

In Dr. Bernie Siegel’s book, 365 prescriptions for the soul, he has a prescription entitled “How does your garden grow?” While he uses imagery of a garden and what’s involved in growing one, he is really writing about our personal growth and the potential he believes is within each one of us.

Readers may recall an article in The Herald, back on December 30, 2016 entitled, “Mountie praised for not shooting”, written by Erin Christie. Referring to an “...axe-wielding Keremeos man (who) threatened a police officer...called in to help,” the Judge, before sentencing the man, “...told …

Some years ago now, I was part of a discussion group in which I heard a comment which has remained with me. A woman in the group said she had heard a member of a Quaker group say that the most appropriate prayer we can offer is one of thankfulness.

Some years ago now, I was part of a discussion group in which I heard a comment which has remained with me. A woman in the group said she had heard a member of a Quaker group say that the most appropriate prayer we can offer is one of thankfulness.

In the December edition of the Anglican Journal, Editor Marites N. Sison has an article entitled: “Where’s the world’s outrage for Syria?”

In his book, Living a life that matters, Harold Kushner has a chapter entitled: “Best actor in a supporting role.” He is referring to the Academy Awards held each year in which actors, actresses, directors, etc. - the best in the various categories - are given oscars for their accomplishments.

Most of us are aware of the Soupateria which serves soup, sandwiches, and often extras, on a daily basis, in the Anglican church hall in Penticton. Its website says, “(It) was started in 1986 through an

Life is such that events - good, bad, and in between, happen to all of us.

I am sure many of us have felt hurt, whenever someone has criticized us for something we have said or done. And often we find ourselves responding to it in a negative way.

In one of the Chicken soup for the soul books, with the sub-title “Life lessons for loving the way you live", Jennifer Read Hawthorne (a best-selling author with the New York Times), has an article entitled “Learn how to listen.”

John Shelby Spong, who is a retired Episcopal bishop from Newark, New Jersey, was recently invited to address the National Conference of the American Humanist Association.

In his book, Wonder: Moments that Keep you Falling in Love with Life, Arthur Gordon tells about an incident in which friends of his family received some bad news.

We have heard stories of people responding to help the people of Fort McMurray, many who did not know where they were going to go and who faced danger as they tried to escape the fires.

In one of the Chicken soup for the soul books, (101 stories to open the heart and rekindle the spirit), the writer, Don Clark, includes a story from his book, Weathering the storm.

Recently, the Attawapiskat First Nations declared a state of emergency over the epidemic of suicides and attempted suicides carried out by youth in their community. It is not the first such alarm we have heard from an indigenous community in Canada; but it reiterates an important concern.

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In his book, Living a life that matters, Harold Kushner writes about how important it is that, as the title suggests, we do live a life that matters and that we feel a sense of fulfillment in what we do.

In a Letter to the Editor on February 25/16, John Thompson wrote: “Mr. Trudeau’s decision to remove our CF 18s from war on ISIS shows a lack of wisdom and leadership.”

In his book, All I really need to know I learned in kindergarten, Robert Fulghum writes about the important place we can fill in each other’s lives.

I appreciated the  letter to the editor of Jan. 8 re: “Learn from our history”, written in the Penticton Herald by Clay Stacey of Kelowna.

Shakespeare once wrote: “How far that little candle throws his beams! So shine a good deed in a naughty world.”

On the Internet, I found a story entitled, “Christmas story: for the man who hated Christmas”, written by Nancy W. Gavin.

As the Canadian Press reported in the Herald on November 30, the fight against ISIS “...has taken on a new urgency in France after terrorists claiming to be inspired by the movement killed 130 people earlier this month in Paris in seven co-ordinated attacks.”

In the November 14th edition of Toronto’s Globe and Mail newspaper, there was an article, written by Daniel Leblanc, about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “setting the bar high for conduct by his cabinet ministers”.