Greg Perry

This political cartoon by Greg Perry appeared in the Saturday, July 23, 2022 edition of The Penticton Herald.

Thank you everyone for saving my life

Dear Editor:

I was taking a morning walk in Penticton Sunday and had just reached the cut between Churchill Ave. and Alexander Ave., when my heart stopped. The world slid sideways and I hit the pavement unconscious on my back.

Neighbours and visitors who saw this immediately rushed to my aid. One woman held my bloody head, another from Vancouver did chest compressions and someone else called 911.

The first thing I remember was being loaded into the ambulance where a technician said my pulse was 15/bpm. At Penticton Regional Hospital, the Emergency Room got right on me and stabilized my heart. Then a surgeon inserted an external pacemaker and I was wheeled up to the ICU.

The next day, July 18, the supervisor there organized an operating theatre and another surgeon who inserted a permanent pacemaker. One day later, I was released and walked out of the hospital to be driven home by my wife.

I would like to thank everyone involved, my neighbours, strangers, the ambulance crew, the staff in Penticton Regional Hospital’s emergency department, the ICU staff and the two surgeons who, together, saved my life. What a great city this is, what wonderful people. Thank you again.

Frank Hilliard

Penticton

Liberals seem terrified of Pierre Poilievre

Dear Editor:

I see that Justin Trudeau’s numero uno fan, Patrick MacDonald is back at it again warning Canadians that the barbarians are once more at the gate, in the guise of Pierre Poilievre and the Conservative party of Canada (Herald, July 15).

He once again quotes individuals and columnists who lean to the right, trying his best to paint Poilievre as the next Trump or Genghis Khan. I was a little concerned that reading all of that right-wing material may sway MacDonald from his left-wing leanings. However, he proved he was a true Liberal by letting us know that he knows most Canadians, including Conservatives, don’t share Poilievre’s values and would never elect him.

Why does that prove he’s a true federal Liberal? Why that’s because, not only do the Trudeau Liberals know what we think, they are more than happy to tell us what to think. At least Patrick was able to inform us that Justin and his cronies have absolutely no responsibility for the crushing inflation, hitting middle-class families and seniors throughout the country in spite of the fact that economists say that their out-of-control spending and punitive carbon tax are exasperating the perfect storm.

What do they know anyway? After all, Justin, himself doesn’t think about things like finances. Sure, Canada has come through the COVID crisis worse than any G7 nation, but there are sunny days ahead, right?

You have to know that the Liberals are really worried about Poilievre winning the Conservative leadership, because of all of the attention they are giving him. They will continue to compare him to Trump, even though the only similarity is that they both picked up on the anger and frustration of middle-class citizens with the ruling elite and decades of losing ground.

Aside from the many differences between Poilievre and Trump like the middle-class upbringing as opposed to a silver spoon, and totally different lifestyles, the main one is that Trump just said what people wanted to hear without meaning it, whereas Poilievre does.

That scares the Liberals. One thing I will agree on that Trudeau did right. His haircut choice was right on and, to me, a true reflection of his leadership.

Andy Richards

Summerland

Time for the Ukraine to negotiate with Russia

Dear Editor:

Returning the turbines to Germany angered the Kyiv government and the Ukrainian diaspora in Canada.

Do we let Germany fall?

Those turbines, sent to Canada for repair before the Russian invasion, were frozen in limbo when Canada announced trade sanctions on all things Russian. As the war wore on and sanctions escalated, Germany’s energy stockpile dwindled, winter is coming and Germany faces energy rationing, scheduled industry shut downs and a severe economic downturn.

The American-led economic sanctions by NATO against Russian oil and gas have actually hurt EU countries. Were Europe to replace its dependency on Russia with Canadian energy and permanently partner with Canadian agriculture to preserve global food security, Canada would of course benefit. But building ports in eastern Canada and refitting European ports to receive the LNG is estimated to take a couple of years; meanwhile, Germany is firing up coal plants and nuclear power reactors – but it will not be quick enough to avoid bone-crushing energy prices, which is fueling a grinding inflation that will collapse the economy.

Pentagon officials warn that Ukraine has not adjusted its strategy to fight a sustained war of attrition. They say, Ukrainian forces are outgunned, largely outranged in artillery and they have been “mauled.” The Pentagon worries Ukraine will run out of soldiers and munitions – the West can not replace losses fast enough and this makes Ukraine’s victory elusive at best. Events on the ground change faster than the West’s assumptions about them and as a result the actions we take are usually, too little too late.

A protracted Ukrainian conflict will test the resolve of NATO allies. Sanctions have backfired, it is western prices for food and fuel that soar, inflation riles voters and western consumers are starting to grumble. It is time for allies to convince President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to negotiate with Russia, even if it means the eastern Donbass region and Crimea are lost. Nothing will be gained by continuing to fight. The Ukrainians are getting pummeled and the military and political strategy of fighting to the last man standing, is a futile fanatical gesture of a few and totally ruinous for ordinary Ukrainians.

Russia says it remains open to negotiations – the Kyiv government foolishly remains against negotiations.

Jon Peter Christoff

West Kelowna

Disgraceful way of dealing with animals

Dear Editor:

The tiny country of Malawi, in Southeastern Africa, is currently undertaking the huge task of tranquilizing and relocating 250 elephants, so they may have a better life in a national park called Kusungu, in Northern Africa. This is an enormous effort, and comes at a cost of $1.5 million, taken on by their government.

However, here in British Columbia, no one can be bothered to relocate some bears, or move a few beavers to a new pond. Shoot the bears! Drown the beavers! They are in the way, so just kill them!

What a complete disgrace this is. Shame on all of you who are involved in the indiscriminate murder of our wildlife.

Sally Kelly

Kelowna

Private sector options offer health-care options

Dear Editor:

As you curse the family doctor shortage, consider the following list of health professionals: Dentists, optometrists, chiropractors, physiotherapists, massage therapists, dental hygienists, naturopaths, acupuncturists, pharmacists, psychologists, occupational therapists, opticians, audiologists and dieticians. I could go on. None of these is in short supply. All practise mostly outside of the publicly funded health-care system.

Now for a shorter list: Physicians, nurses, operating-room hours, hospital beds, medical diagnostic tests. All are in short supply, all are publicly funded under B.C.’s Medical Services Plan pursuant to the Canada Health Act.

In each case, the government (with help from professional associations), rather than market forces, controls the sum of money made available to spend on these medical services. The government, in other words, controls the supply.

MSP does its job well when one is seriously ill or injured, and in managing most chronic conditions.

You won’t become impoverished by accessing essential medical care in Canada. Yet MSP is seriously out of step with the rest of society. If I have the means, I can buy a house, a car, good food, clothing, a higher education, entertainment or take a nice vacation.

Give me a hernia or a bum hip, on the other hand, and my money becomes suddenly worthless. The medical services might be there; I just can’t purchase them.

Medicare, as expected, has been a great leveller in society — but, lately, has also become a great spoiler.

In this observation, I am not concerned with the very wealthy among us. They usually find a way to get what they want. My focus is the vast majority of us situated between the very wealthy and the very poor.

Normally, a shortage of some good or service will lead to one or a combination of three results: increased supply, reduced demand, or rationing. Health care is already rationed, and reduced demand is not likely.

It’s time to allow and encourage the private sector to provide elective surgeries and to train health-care professionals, including doctors and nurses. We need to greatly increase the supply using innovative ideas and new sources of private-sector funding.

Brian Mason

Victoria

Thank you everyone

for saving my life

 

  Dear EDITOR:

I was taking a morning walk in Penticton Sunday and had just reached the cut between Churchill Ave. and Alexander Ave., when my heart stopped. The world slid sideways and I hit the pavement unconscious on my back.

Neighbours and visitors who saw this immediately rushed to my aid. One woman held my bloody head, another from Vancouver did chest compressions and someone else called 911.

The first thing I remember was being loaded into the ambulance where a technician said my pulse was 15/bpm. At Penticton Regional Hospital, the Emergency Room got right on me and stabilized my heart. Then a surgeon inserted an external pacemaker and I was wheeled up to the ICU.

The next day, July 18, the supervisor there organized an operating theatre and another surgeon who inserted a permanent pacemaker. One day later, I was released and walked out of the hospital to be driven home by my wife.

I would like to thank everyone involved, my neighbours, strangers, the ambulance crew, the staff in Penticton Regional Hospital’s emergency department, the ICU staff and the two surgeons who, together, saved my life. What a great city this is, what wonderful people. Thank you again.

Frank Hilliard

Penticton

Liberals seem terrified

of  Pierre Poilievre

 

  Dear EDITOR:

I see that Justin Trudeau’s numero uno fan, Patrick MacDonald is back at it again warning Canadians that the barbarians are once more at the gate, in the guise of Pierre Poilievre and the Conservative party of Canada (Herald, July 15).

He once again quotes individuals and columnists who lean to the right, trying his best to paint Poilievre as the next Trump or Genghis Khan. I was a little concerned that reading all of that right-wing material may sway MacDonald from his left-wing leanings. However, he proved he was a true Liberal by letting us know that he knows most Canadians, including Conservatives, don’t share Poilievre’s values and would never elect him.

Why does that prove he’s a true federal Liberal? Why that’s because, not only do the Trudeau Liberals know what we think, they are more than happy to tell us what to think. At least Patrick was able to inform us that Justin and his cronies have absolutely no responsibility for the crushing inflation, hitting middle-class families and seniors throughout the country in spite of the fact that economists say that their out-of-control spending and  punitive carbon tax are exasperating the perfect storm.

What do they know anyway? After all, Justin, himself doesn’t think about things like finances. Sure, Canada has come through the COVID crisis worse than any G7 nation, but there are sunny days ahead, right?

You have to know that the Liberals are really worried about Poilievre winning the Conservative leadership, because of all of the attention they are giving him. They will continue to compare him to Trump, even though the only similarity is that they both picked up on the anger and frustration of middle-class citizens with the ruling elite and decades of losing ground.

Aside from the many differences between Poilievre and Trump like the middle-class upbringing as opposed to a silver spoon, and totally different lifestyles, the main one is that Trump just said what people wanted to hear without meaning it, whereas Poilievre does.

That scares the Liberals. One thing I will agree on that Trudeau did right. His haircut choice was right on and, to me, a true reflection of his leadership.

Andy Richards

Summerland

Time for the Ukraine to negotiate with Russia

 

  Dear EDITOR:

 Returning the turbines to Germany angered the Kyiv government and the Ukrainian diaspora in Canada.

Do we let Germany fall?

Those turbines, sent to Canada for repair before the Russian invasion, were frozen in limbo when Canada announced trade sanctions on all things Russian. As the war wore on and sanctions escalated, Germany’s energy stockpile dwindled, winter is coming and Germany faces energy rationing, scheduled industry shut downs and a severe economic downturn.

The American-led economic sanctions by NATO against Russian oil and gas have actually hurt EU countries. Were Europe to replace its dependency on Russia with Canadian energy and permanently partner with Canadian agriculture to preserve global food security, Canada would of course benefit. But building ports in eastern Canada and refitting European ports to receive the LNG is estimated to take a couple of years; meanwhile, Germany is firing up coal plants and nuclear power reactors – but it will not be quick enough to avoid bone-crushing energy prices, which is fueling a grinding inflation that will collapse the economy.

Pentagon officials warn that Ukraine has not adjusted its strategy to fight a sustained war of attrition. They say, Ukrainian forces are outgunned, largely outranged in artillery and they have been “mauled.” The Pentagon worries Ukraine will run out of soldiers and munitions – the West can not replace losses fast enough and this makes Ukraine’s victory elusive at best. Events on the ground change faster than the West’s assumptions about them and as a result the actions we take are usually, too little too late.  

A protracted Ukrainian conflict will test the resolve of NATO allies. Sanctions have backfired, it is western prices for food and fuel that soar, inflation riles voters and western consumers are starting to grumble. It is time for allies to convince President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to negotiate with Russia, even if it means the eastern Donbass region and Crimea are lost. Nothing will be gained by continuing to fight. The Ukrainians are getting pummeled and the military and political strategy of fighting to the last man standing, is a futile fanatical gesture of a few and totally ruinous for ordinary Ukrainians.

Russia says it remains open to negotiations – the Kyiv government foolishly remains against negotiations.

Jon Peter Christoff

West Kelowna

Disgraceful way of

dealing with animals

 

  Dear EDITOR:

 The tiny country of Malawi, in Southeastern Africa, is currently undertaking the huge task of tranquilizing and relocating 250 elephants, so they may have a better life in a national park called Kusungu, in Northern Africa. This is an enormous effort, and comes at a cost of

$1.5 million, taken on by their government.

However, here in British Columbia, no one can be bothered to relocate some bears, or move a few beavers to a new pond. Shoot the bears! Drown the beavers! They are in the way, so just kill them!

What a complete disgrace this is. Shame on all of you who are involved in the indiscriminate murder of our wildlife.

Sally Kelly

Kelowna

Private sector options offer health-care options

 

  Dear EDITOR:

As you curse the family doctor shortage, consider the following list of health professionals: Dentists, optometrists, chiropractors, physiotherapists, massage therapists, dental hygienists, naturopaths, acupuncturists, pharmacists, psychologists, occupational therapists, opticians, audiologists and dieticians. I could go on. None of these is in short supply. All practise mostly outside of the publicly funded health-care system.

Now for a shorter list: Physicians, nurses, operating-room hours, hospital beds, medical diagnostic tests. All are in short supply, all are publicly funded under B.C.’s Medical Services Plan pursuant to the Canada Health Act.

In each case, the government (with help from professional associations), rather than market forces, controls the sum of money made available to spend on these medical services. The government, in other words, controls the supply.

MSP does its job well when one is seriously ill or injured, and in managing most chronic conditions.

You won’t become impoverished by accessing essential medical care in Canada. Yet MSP is seriously out of step with the rest of society. If I have the means, I can buy a house, a car, good food, clothing, a higher education, entertainment or take a nice vacation.

Give me a hernia or a bum hip, on the other hand, and my money becomes suddenly worthless. The medical services might be there; I just can’t purchase them.

Medicare, as expected, has been a great leveller in society — but, lately, has also become a great spoiler.

In this observation, I am not concerned with the very wealthy among us. They usually find a way to get what they want. My focus is the vast majority of us situated between the very wealthy and the very poor.

Normally, a shortage of some good or service will lead to one or a combination of three results: increased supply, reduced demand, or rationing. Health care is already rationed, and reduced demand is not likely.

It’s time to allow and encourage the private sector to provide elective surgeries and to train health-care professionals, including doctors and nurses. We need to greatly increase the supply using innovative ideas and new sources of private-sector funding.

Brian Mason

Victoria