Pope sorry for forced assimilation of Indigenous people at residential schools

Pope Francis is greeted by George Arcand, Grand Chief of the Confederacy of Treaty Six First Nations, as he arrives in Edmonton on Sunday, July 24, 2022. His visit to Canada is aimed at reconciliation with Indigenous people for the Catholic Church's role in residential schools.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Commenting on papal visit to Canada

Dear Editor:

Re: The papal visit

The theory was to “kill the Indian in the child,” but in practice it often became to kill the Indian child.

Joy Lang

Penticton

Canada shouldn’t pick up tab for pope’s visit

Dear Editor:

From time to time I struggle through reading Fr. Harry Clark’s contributions to the letters page. But this time I find it quite difficult — he is just quoting from the scriptures and hinting about the Catholic Church’s confession method.

And of course, riding in on the present situation to push Pope Francis into the forefront. Not everyone in this country is enamoured of this man and wants to hear about him ad nauseum.

His visit was arranged by the Indigenous people and others with the Vatican that he come to Canada to offer apologies for the abuse and harm the Catholics had done to children in their so-called care in the residential schools. He was not invited here for a show of adulation.

As for the $32-million funds to assist in hosting him — why can’t the Catholic Church pick up the tab for this — they are reputed to be one of (if not the most) the wealthiest organizations known? Instead, this will come down to ordinary taxpaying Canadians.

It seems his visit and well-published masses will outshine the real purpose for him to be here. I hope the seniors of the Indigenous people are aware of this.

And now we learn that thousands are trying to see him, travelling by bus, plane and even boats! What for? No doubt he will be presented in his white brocade robes and red pumps, when he should be wearing a plain black cassock and good walking shoes; unfortunately sack-cloth is not available now.

Many won’t even be able to see “the Holy Father,”although they were there, and maybe then they will realize that there is only One God and His name is not Francis.

Marjorie Montgomery

Penticton

No justification for PM’s travel expenses

Dear Editor:

News reports indicate that the prime minister came to Kelowna on Monday, July 18, flying with his entourage in the Challenger jet and that he invited some of the media to join him, but said they were not allowed to ask questions.

In Kelowna, he apparently visited a number of businesses and spoke with owners and employees, and met a number of city council members, as well as with local officials of the Liberal Party, and he had a reunion with former MP for Kelowna– Lake Country, Stephen Fuhr. Fuhr subsequently said that the PM’s visit was not a photo op.

Trudeau later flew from Kelowna to Penticton, from where he went to Summerland, and again met up with some local councillors, some bringing their children along as well. He later visited a local cherry orchard where he clowned about his poor performance picking cherries and how he preferred to keep his day job until he retires.

What arrogance, thinking that he deserves to stay in office beyond the next election.

Before returning to the Penticton airport, Trudeau had some of his staff members request of the operators of the Kettle Valley Historic railway to hold their regular tourist train on the trestle at the Canyon View Station where he could blow the train’s whistle.

The news coverage of the prime minister’s visit to the Okanagan was without doubt a series of photo ops. The same was the case on the following day when he took his private plane to Vancouver for more photo ops, and no questions from the media.

I simply can’t see any justification for the expenditure of a huge sum on his travels, and do hope that there is some way in which the media can obtain what was the total cost of operating the aircraft, his security detail, the Mounties and a hotel stop on Monday before he headed further west.

Hopefully, through Freedom to Information legislation, the media can get some answers then make that information. public.

Robert Mason

Summerland

Yesterday’s solutions, tomorrow’s problems

Dear Editor:

Patrick MacDonald’s sunshine pump is working overtime to inflate Justin Trudeau’s collapsing approval ratings  (Herald letters, July 21).

When did freedom become a bad thing?

The quest for freedom and opportunity is what motivated people to come to this country and throw off the shackles of kings, dictators and oppressive governments.

People are reacting to the iron fist of government which is increasingly showing through the velvet glove of benevolence. Governments don’t always know best. If they did, they wouldn’t have to keep apologizing and we wouldn’t need to keep spending billions to clean up their messes.

No one should object to taxes; as long as they’re fair and reasonable and don’t suffocate the individual and their possibilities. Government is supposed the servant of the people, not their master.

MacDonald wants blanket approval for immigrants to practice their profession, whether or not they meet Canadian standards. This involves public safety and there are few short cuts. Certification is required to meet standards, but MacDonald is free to choose whichever brand of electrician or doctor he wants.

Should vaccination status have been a discriminator to fire 2,500 of our health care workers?

When COVID struck we championed our medical people for their heroic efforts. Two years later, the unvaccinated were labelled unacceptable and dismissed by BC Health. They could have been retained with testing as an alternative to vaccination. My body, my choice? Loyalty works two ways.

Vaccine does buffer the impact of COVID, but vaccinated people can contract and transmit the plague.

Justin Trudeau and many others are living proof, but political science prevailed over medical science. Why is government keeping any COVID mandates, other than for the sake of control? People are voting against this with their feet.

The healthcare system is in crisis because of personnel shortages. Having those 2,500 COVID dismissals back at work would help. What has this mandate actually achieved?

We should anticipate a class action settlement for wrongful dismissal.

Yesterday’s solutions often become tomorrow’s problems.

It doesn’t take an economist to know that things only get worse when governments print and spend money in inflationary times. Inflation isn’t Trudeau’s fault, but his reckless spending sure hasn’t helped.

Let’s just hope he doesn’t try Pierre Trudeau’s wage and price controls as this swirls around the bowl.

Trudeau should stop talking about what Canadians believe, feel and want because it’s increasingly obvious that it’s a lot less of him.

John Thompson

Kaleden

Maybe Adrian Dix should be the next to go

Dear Editor:

Does anyone else find it curious that in the blink of an eye the NDP-controlled board of B.C. Ferries fired the CEO for presiding over unreliable and unacceptable ferry service, yet after years of deplorable health care in the province – that has, indeed, gotten worse – that the Minister of Health, Adrian Dix, has not been fired? Isn’t time to face up to the incompetence at the helm?

Lawrence Horwitz

Victoria

Trudeau family legacy is skyrocketing inflation

Dear Editor:

Not surprisingly, our country has now entered the highest inflation rate since Pierre Elliott Trudeau was Prime Minister.

He has taught his son well in the Trudeau tradition of bringing financial hardship to Canadians.

Fred B. Woodward

Kelowna

Enjoyed the great sounds of Gord McLaren

Dear Editor:

Friends and I attended Music in the Park at Gyro Park on Friday evening.

It was a beautiful evening and Gord McLaren sang some familiar tunes and some of his originals.

A young couple danced beautifully and before long the “dance floor” was alive with dancers losing themselves in the music. It was especially entertaining to watch the kids.

Gord McLaren proved to be a very talented singer-songwriter. All in all it was a heartwarming experience to sit among good people and enjoy good music!

And did I mention, it was free?

Mardy Courtney

Penticton

WRITE: letters@pentictonherald.ca